Analysis of cousin kate by christina rossetti

Cousin Kate by Christina Rossetti

She claims that she did not even know that she was a beautiful girl until a great lord found her out. A term used of speech rhythms in blank verse; an iambic rhythm is an unstressed, or weak, beat followed by a stressed, or strong, beat.

But then, the speaker asks a question to Kate. Why did a great lord find me out To fill my heart with care?

'Cousin Kate' - Synopsis and commentary

Likewise, Rossetti, though seemingly pious and religious, shows sympathy for her fellow women who were not so fortunate as to have escaped being lured in by a man. The man in this poem is clearly vile and the women are at his mercy.

'Cousin Kate' - Language, tone and structure

Hardened by sun and air, Contented with my cottage mates, Not mindful I was fair. Why did a great lord find me out, And praise my flaxen hair? Do they create a sense of sympathy for the speaker? Read the fourth verse aloud and look closely at the rhythm it creates. Her emotions are incredibly strong and the violence of her anger is expressed through her imagination.

This imagery comes from the biblical book of Job, and the description of sitting in the dust and howling is well known as the epitome of despair. Then she says that she sits in the dust and howls.

'Cousin Kate' - Language, tone and structure

Kate was fortunate enough to be able to watch what happened with her cousin before the lord took an interest in herself. She claims that she did not even know that she was a beautiful girl until a great lord found her out. But she cries out to tell her story through these words. Here, the readers can see that what the great lord did for his own joy, was the woe of the young maiden.

Why did a great lord find me out And fill my heart with care? Yet because of the sexual double standards that operated in the nineteenth century, the lord of the manor would Analysis of cousin kate by christina rossetti have been outcast, despite fathering a son outside of marriage. The idea that the lord filled her heart with care suggests that she had less to worry about previously.

Your father would give lands for one To wear his coronet. There are six stanzas, each of eight lines. He wore me like a silken knot, He changed me like a glove; So now I moan, an unclean thing, Who might have been a dove. She compares her true love with the love of her cousin, which she claims was not a true and deep love, but one that was written in the sand and could have been washing away by the tide.

In English poetry this includes stressed and unstressed syllables. Here, the readers can see that what the great lord did for his own joy, was the woe of the young maiden. Her emotions are incredibly strong and the violence of her anger is expressed through her imagination.

Thus, the poet ends her sonnet with the same first quatrain with which she started off. The readers can easily access and identify. This allows the poem to be read at speed and enables a more pronounced rhythm to develop that would be impossible in a poem consisting of longer lines.

Up until now, she has shown that she is living a life of shame while Kate lives a life of glory. Up until now, she has shown that she is living a life of shame while Kate lives a life of glory. There is a shift with this stanza so that the speaker is not talking to the readers anymore, but to her cousin, Kate.

Nor can she come back from the half way. The neighbours call you good and pure, Call me an outcast thing. Active and passive verbs Rossetti emphasises the powerlessness of women in Victorian society by associating the lord with a series of actions which take the initiative.

Do you notice anything unusual? Most men married when a handsome dowry could be offered, and most women sought to marry in such a way that would move them up the societal ladder.

And yet, as every mother can understand, the child was also her pride and joy. The speaker reminds Kate that although she is named a Lady and has a great husband, she herself will come to nothing without a son to inherit the wealth of his parents and grandparents.

Count how many times she names Kate How significant do you think that this naming of Kate is? She says what if you will forget her for a while, and then pretend to remember her by grieving over her death. She in fact freed her ideas to speak up for themselves.In this famous sonnet, 'Remember', writtenthe poet, Christina Rosetti, introduces the themes of love, death, and reaction to death.

Rossetti was a devout Christian, and member of the Church of England. Her mother was Frances Polidori, the sister of Dr John Polidori, who was the friend and doctor of Lord Byron, the poet. May 04,  · Rossetti is a Victorian poet - the daughter of Italian immigrants. In Cousin Kate, she highlights some of the inequalities that characterised the Victorian era.

Cousin Kate by Christina Rossetti Essay Words | 6 Pages. Cousin Kate by Christina Rossetti The poem cousin Kate by Christina Rossetti is about a young girl who falls in love with a great lord (a rich and powerful man), but then he leaves her for her cousin. Cousin Kate is written in the form of 3 and 4 foot iambic trimeters and tetrameters.

This allows the poem to be read at speed and enables a more pronounced rhythm to develop that would be impossible in a poem consisting of longer lines.

A description & analysis of 'O Cousin Kate' by Christina Georgina Rossetti 'O Cousin Kate' - Poem Analysis by Tyler Bryce on Prezi Create Explore Learn & support.

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Analysis of cousin kate by christina rossetti
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